Etienne Benson

The Urbanization of the Eastern Gray Squirrel in the United States

6 November 2013 - comments (3)

L.F. Peck, “Hi, Mister! Scramble a Nut?” Harvard Lampoon, Vol. 46, No. 6 (Dec. 17, 1903), 121.

L.F. Peck, “Hi, Mister! Scramble a Nut?” Harvard Lampoon, Vol. 46, No. 6 (Dec. 17, 1903), p. 121

An article on gray squirrels that I have been working on for a very long time is now available online. It will appear in print in the December 2013 issue of the Journal of American History as “The Urbanization of the Eastern Gray Squirrel in the United States.”

One of my goals in the article was to show that the presence of these ubiquitous and highly visible mammals in North American cities was the result of a very intentional, sustained, and widespread project of late-nineteenth-century urban reformers and nature enthusiasts. It was not an accidental or “natural” process in any conventional sense of the term, although it was also not purely a human project. Squirrels too were crucial participants.

Many of the urban residents who released, fed, sheltered, and protected gray squirrels thought that by doing so they were beautifying the city and elevating the moral character of the community (as well as entertaining themselves). Even though the ideas about charity and community that they held have since largely been discarded in favor of an ecological perspective, the squirrels remain, in part due to their remarkable capacity to adapt to a changing urban environment.

“The Urbanization of the Eastern Gray Squirrel in the United States,” Journal of American History 100, no. 3 (2013): 691-710.